WEBINAR: Radiometals in Theranostics Applications : Present and Future Perspectives

The use of diagnostic and therapeutic pairs (Theranostics) was introduced back in the 50s in the treatment of thyroid cancer. The recent resurgence of this concept due to the successful approval of the radiometal theranostic pair 68Ga/177Lu  has led the field to a new beginning in the era of precision medicine.

In addition, several other therapeutic (225Ac,67Cu, 47Sc, others) and diagnostic radiometal pairs (89Zr, 64Cu, 44/43Sc and others) are under development or early clinical trials opening more possibilities for diverse applications in cancer care.
IBA invites you to attend a free webinar presented by 2 leading figures of Nuclear Medicine: Prof. Andrew Scott and Prof. Jason Lewis. They will share their experience and perspectives in the use of radiometals for cancer imaging and therapy.
 
When? October 4th, 2.30 pm - 3.30 pm CET

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What will you learn from the webinar ?
 
-    Clinical Application of Theranostics with Radiometals
 
Professor Scott will give an overview of clinical applications of theranostics with radiometals, with a focus on translational and clinical studies, and drug development.
 
Professor Andrew Scott is the Director, Department of Molecular Imaging and Therapy, Austin Health; Laboratory Head at the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute; and Professor of Medicine, University of Melbourne, and La Trobe University, in Melbourne, Australia.
 
-    Current Status and Future Directions of Accelerator-produced Radiometals for Therapy and Imaging Applications
 
Professor Lewis will share and thoughts and perspectives on the application of accelarator-produced radiometals in cancer imaging and therapy.
 
Professor Lewis serves as Chief of the Radiochemistry & Imaging Sciences Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering. He is the Director of MSK’s Radiochemistry and Molecular Imaging Probe Core Facility as well as the MSK Center for Molecular Imaging & Nanotechnology. He has served as the President of the World Molecular Imaging Society (2014-2015).

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